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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
to this special edition of the newshour. kwame holman starts us off tonight with an election day wrap-up. then, we take the temperature at the campaigns' headquarters, with ray suarez in chicago and margaret warner in boston. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks join us with their analysis. >> ifill: jeffrey brown on who's voting and why, plus key congressional races with christina bellantoni and stuart rothenberg. >> woodruff: we get historical perspective from michael beschloss and richard norton smith. >> ifill: and hari sreenvasan shows how you can find the latest results online at our data-driven map center. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> music is a universal language. when i was in an accident i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own. with united health care i got help that fit my life, information on my phone, connection to doctors who get where i'm from, and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never miss a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more tha
in need of a spark find one in october? u.s. employers across nearly all sectors were hiring, for a net gain of 171,000 new jobs. the labor department also revised its august and september figures higher, by 84,000. all told, it signaled slow but steady growth, and it was news that president obama wanted to play up in the campaign's final weekend, especially in one critical state. >> "oh (io), oh (io)" >> brown: the president made three stops in the buckeye state, starting in hilliard, just outside columbus. >> in 2008, we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. and today, our businesses have created nearly five and a half million new jobs. and this morning, we learned that companies hired more workers in october than at any time in the last eight months. ( applause ) >> brown: and the trend line seemed promising, as well. since july, the economy has added an average of 173,000 jobs per month, up from just 67,000 a month in the spring. at the same time, though, the unemployment rate ticked up a tenth of a point in october to 7.9% as more
closed just a moment ago at theag the hour. using exit polling data and surveys of early voters, the associated press is beginning to project a winner in a number of states. we're going to be watching for that as soon as we get it. i'm told, gwen, we do haveoneon call. the networks, two television networks are projecting the state of kentucky will go for mitt romney which is not a surprise. a state that john mccain won four years ago. >> ifill: not a big surprise. all of these results will-jump-starting the all-important electoral college count. 270 is the magic numberne candidate has to reach to become the next president. right now the associated press is predicting nothing because we don't know yet what is going to happen with those electoral votes. but we're waiting. >> woodruff: i just now am being told, gwen, and this information is comingnn as we're sitting here. the sta of indiana has been projected. mitt romney is projected the winner in the state of indiana. that is a state barackbama won narrow w but he did win it four years ago. but this is not a surprise. it was expe
for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. d. this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: with the election over, there's new talk in washington about finally coming to grips with taxes, spending and the deficit. the mammoth problem has been hanging over congress and president for many months, and now, time is running out. in just five days, lawmakers troop back to the capitol for a final, lame-duck session. and they are under mounting pressure to avoid going off the much-talked-about fiscal cliff. come january 1, the bush-era tax cuts will expire as will a 2% payroll tax cut that was passed in december of 2010. at the same time, large automatic spending cuts would begin to bite-- 10% less for defense in 2013 and an 8% cut in domestic programs. t
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)